James Moody
  • James Moody

  • Robert O. Keohane Professor of Sociology
  • Sociology
  • 268 Soc/psych Bldg., Durham, NC 27708
  • Campus Box 90088
  • Phone: (919) 660-5650
  • Fax: 919-660-5623
  • Homepage
  • Overview

    James Moody is the Robert O. Keohane professor of sociology at Duke University. He has published extensively in the field of social networks, methods, and social theory. His work has focused theoretically on the network foundations of social cohesion and diffusion, with a particular emphasis on building tools and methods for understanding dynamic social networks. He has used network models to help understand school racial segregation, adolescent health, disease spread, economic development, and the development of scientific disciplines. Moody's work is funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and has appeared in top social science, health and medical journals. He is winner of INSNA's (International Network for Social Network Analysis) Freeman Award for scholarly contributions to network analysis, founding director of the Duke Network Analysis Center and editor of the on-line Journal of Social Structure.
  • Areas of Interest

    Social networks
    theory
    quantitative methodology
  • Education

      • Ph.D.,
      • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
      • 1999
      • PhD in Sociology,
      • Sociology,
      • University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill,
      • 1999
      • M.A.,
      • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
      • 1997
      • MA in Sociology,
      • Sociology,
      • University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill,
      • 1997
      • B.S.,
      • University of Oregon,
      • 1992
  • Selected Publications

      • J Adams and J Moody.
      • (2006).
      • To tell the truth: informant accuracy in sexual networks.
      • Social Networks
      • ,
      • 29
      • ,
      • 44-58.
      • Moody, James.
      • (2006).
      • Trends in Sociology Titles.
      • The American Sociologist
      • ,
      • 37
      • ,
      • 77-80.
      • J Moody and R Light.
      • (2006).
      • A view from above: The evolving sociological landscape.
      • American Sociologist
      • ,
      • 37
      • (2)
      • ,
      • 67-86.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      How has sociology evolved over the last 40 years? In this paper, we examine networks built on thousands of sociology-relevant papers to map sociology's position in the wider social sciences and identify changes in the most prominent research fronts in the discipline. We find first that sociology seems to have traded centrality in the field of social sciences for internal cohesion: sociology is central, but not nearly as well bounded as neighboring disciplines such as economics or law, Internally, sociology appears to have moved away from research topics associated with fundamental social processes and toward social-problems research. We end by discussing strategies for extending this work to wider science production networks.

      • J Moody, D McFarland and S Bender‐deMoll.
      • (2005).
      • Dynamic Network Visualization.
      • American Journal of Sociology
      • ,
      • 110
      • (4)
      • ,
      • 1206-1241.
      • [web]
      • Bearman, Peter S. and James Moody.
      • (2004).
      • Suicide and Friendship: Among American Adolescents.
      • American Journal of Public Health
      • ,
      • 94
      • ,
      • 89-95.
      • Moody, James.
      • (2004).
      • The Structure of a Social Science Collaboration Network: Disciplinary Cohesion from 1963 to 1999.
      • American Sociological Review
      • ,
      • 69
      • ,
      • 213-238.
      • Bearman, Peter S., James Moody, and Katherine Stovel.
      • (2004).
      • Chains of Affection: The Structure of Adolescent Romantic and Sexual Networks.
      • American Journal of Sociology
      • ,
      • 110
      • ,
      • 44-91.
      • (Winner of the American Journal of Sociology Annual Gould Prize for best paper published that year)
      • Moody, James and Douglas R. White.
      • (2003).
      • Structural Cohesion and Embeddedness: A hierarchical conception of Social Groups.
      • American Sociological Review
      • ,
      • 68
      • ,
      • 103-127.
      • (Winner of the ASA Mathematical Sociology Section award for best article publication, 2004)
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