Gary Gereffi
  • Gary Gereffi

  • Professor with Tenure
  • Sociology
  • 264
  • Campus Box 90088
  • Phone: (919) 660-5611
  • Fax: (919) 660-5623
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Overview

    Gary Gereffi's major ongoing research projects are:  (1) a book on the uptake of the global value chain paradigm by major international organizations in the economic and social development arena (expected completion date: Dec. 2015); (2) work with the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank on export competitiveness, workforce development, and regional value chains, with an emphasis on Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa; (3) member of the Global Agenda Council on “The Future of Manufacturing” (World Economic Forum), which will initiate a bi-annual “Global Manufacturing and Industrialization Summit” co-sponsored by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), beginning in 2016; and  (4) “A Global Value Chain Analysis of Food Security and Food Staples in the Energy-Exporting Countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region,” funded by the Minerva Initiative (U.S. Dept. of Defense) (2012-2016).
  • Other

    Google Scholar Homepage
  • Areas of Interest

    Development,
    Comparative/Historical Sociology,
    Economy and Society
  • Education

      • Ph.D.,
      • Sociology,
      • Yale University,
      • 1980
      • M.A. & M.Phil.,
      • Sociology,
      • Yale University,
      • 1974
      • B.A.,
      • Sociology,
      • University of Notre Dame,
      • 1970
  • Selected Publications

      • T Sturgeon, G Gereffi, A Guinn and E Zylberberg.
      • (2014).
      • A Indstria Brasileira e as Candenas Globais de Valor (Brazilian Industry en Global Value Chains).
      • Elsevier.
      • G Gereffi.
      • (February, 2014).
      • Global value chains in a post-Washington Consensus world.
      • Review of International Political Economy
      • ,
      • 21
      • (1)
      • ,
      • 9-37.
      • [web]
      • Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi, Sebastien Miroudot, and Daria Taglioni.
      • (April, 2013).
      • Joining, Upgrading and Being Competitive in Global Value Chains: A Strategic Framework.
      • World Bank
      • .
      • (Policy Research Working Paper 6406)
      • [web]
      • J Lee, G Gereffi and J Beauvais.
      • (July 31, 2012).
      • Global value chains and agrifood standards: challenges and possibilities for smallholders in developing countries..
      • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      • ,
      • 109
      • (31)
      • ,
      • 12326-12331.
      • (Part of Special Feature on “Agriculture Development and Nutrition Security.”)
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      The rise of private food standards has brought forth an ongoing debate about whether they work as a barrier for smallholders and hinder poverty reduction in developing countries. This paper uses a global value chain approach to explain the relationship between value chain structure and agrifood safety and quality standards and to discuss the challenges and possibilities this entails for the upgrading of smallholders. It maps four potential value chain scenarios depending on the degree of concentration in the markets for agrifood supply (farmers and manufacturers) and demand (supermarkets and other food retailers) and discusses the impact of lead firms and key intermediaries on smallholders in different chain situations. Each scenario is illustrated with case examples. Theoretical and policy issues are discussed, along with proposals for future research in terms of industry structure, private governance, and sustainable value chains.

      • Cornelia Staritz, Gary Gereffi and Olivier Cattaneo, co-editors.
      • (2011).
      • Shifting End Markets and Upgrading Prospects in Global Value Chains.
      • [web]
      • G Gereffi and J Lee.
      • (July, 2012).
      • Why the World Suddenly Cares About Global Supply Chains.
      • JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
      • ,
      • 48
      • (3)
      • ,
      • 24-32.
      • [web]
      • G Gereffi and M Christian.
      • (2009).
      • The Impacts of Wal-Mart: The Rise and Consequences of the World's Dominant Retailer.
      • ANNUAL REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY
      • ,
      • 35
      • (573-591)
      • ,
      • 573-591.
      • [web]
      • S Barrientos, G Gereffi and A Rossi.
      • (2011).
      • Economic and social upgrading in global production networks: A new paradigm for a changing world.
      • INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW
      • ,
      • 150
      • (3-4)
      • ,
      • 319-340.
      • [web]
      • G Gereffi.
      • (2011).
      • Global Value Chains and International Competition.
      • The Antitrust Bulletin
      • ,
      • 56
      • (1)
      • ,
      • 37-56.
      • [web]
      • F Mayer and G Gereffi.
      • (Winter, 2010).
      • Regulation and economic globalization: Prospects and limits of private governance.
      • Business and Politics
      • ,
      • 12
      • (3)
      • .
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      Corporate codes of conduct, product certifications, process standards, and other voluntary, non-governmental forms of private governance have proliferated in the last two decades. These innovations are a response to social pressures unleashed by globalization and the inadequacy of governmental institutions for addressing its social and environmental impacts. Private governance has had some notable successes, but there are clear limits to what it alone can be expected to accomplish. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of private governance depends on four main factors: 1) the structure of the particular global value chain in which production takes place; 2) the extent to which demand for a firm's products relies on its brand identity; 3) the possibilities for collective action by consumers, workers, or other activists to exert pressure on producers; and 4) the extent to which commercial interests of lead firms align with social and environmental concerns. Taken together, these hypotheses suggest that private governance will flourish in only a limited set of circumstances. With the trend towards consolidation of production in the largest developing countries, however, we also see a strengthening of some forms of public governance. Private governance will not disappear, but it will be linked to emerging forms of multi-stakeholder institutions. © 2010 Berkeley Electronic Press. All rights reserved.

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