Lisa A. Keister
  • Lisa A. Keister

  • Gilhuly Family Professor of Sociology
  • Sociology
  • 268 Soc/psych Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
  • Campus Box 90088
  • Phone: (919) 660-5624
  • Fax: 919-660-5623
  • Homepage
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Overview

    I am an economic sociologist who studies wealth inequality (particularly in the United States) and organizations (particularly in China). Both research agendas explore the emergence of social structure and the subsequent effect of social structure on the behaviors of actors. Some of my recent work has explored the one percent of wealth owners, religion and inequality, immigrant wealth ownership, Chinese American attainment, and business networks in China. My work on wealth includes research into the growing concentration of wealth and the factors that affect wealth accumulation over the life course. For example, I have studied the role that contemporary work arrangements, religious affiliation, and immigration play in shaping wealth ownership and other SES outcomes. I also study business networks, including relations among firms in China and how these shape firm performance, survival, and structure.
  • Specialties

    • Intellectual Interests
  • Areas of Interest

    Economic sociology
    Immigration
    Religion
    Organizations and organization theory
    Social stratification
    Chinese economic transformation
    Chinese society
    Entrepreneurship
  • Education

      • Ph.D.,
      • Cornell University,
      • 1997
      • M.A.,
      • Cornell University,
      • 1995
      • M.A.,
      • University of Oklahoma,
      • 1991
      • BA (magna cum laude and With Distinction),
      • comparative area studies, Duke University,
      • 1989
  • Selected Publications

      • Lisa A. Keister.
      • (2014).
      • The One Percent.
      • Annual Review of Sociology
      • .
      • LA Keister and HY Lee.
      • (2014).
      • The One Percent: Wealth and Income Concentration.
      • Sociological Currents
      • .
      • Lisa A. Keister and Darren E. Sherkat, editors.
      • (2014).
      • Religion and Inequality.
      • Cambridge University Press.
      • LA Keister and EP Borelli.
      • (2012).
      • Market transition: An assessment of the state of the field.
      • Sociological Perspectives
      • ,
      • 55
      • (2)
      • ,
      • 267-294.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      Dramatic changes in global politics and economics have led a large number of economies to undergo transition from socialism to some form of market system. Sociologists have taken advantage of economic transition to develop and test ideas about basic social processes; this article assesses the state of the rich but contentious new literature that has resulted. The article provides a review and evaluation of sociological research that explores the two aspects of transition that have attracted the greatest attention: the nature of the transition process and the consequences of transition for stratification and mobility. The authors address the two theoretical approaches-institutional and corporatist-that have been the center of intense debate regarding transition and evaluate the empirical evidence for each. The authors argue that empirical evidence provides support for elements of each but that detailed scope conditions and more nuanced arguments are critical. © 2012 by Pacific Sociological Association. All rights reserved.

      • Lisa A. Keister.
      • (2011).
      • Faith and Money: How Religious Belief Contributes to Wealth and Poverty.
      • Cambridge University Press.
      • LA Keister.
      • (2011).
      • Religion and Attainment.
      • Sociological Focus
      • ,
      • 44
      • ,
      • 354-83.
      • LA Keister.
      • (2005).
      • Getting Rich: America’s New Rich and How They Got That Way.
      • Cambridge University Press.
      • LA Keister.
      • (2010).
      • Business Groups in China.
      • American Behavioral Scientist
      • .
      • LA Keister and Y Zhang.
      • (2009).
      • Organizations and Management in China.
      • ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT ANNALS
      • ,
      • 3
      • ,
      • 377-420.
      • [web]
  • View All Publications
  • Teaching

    • SOCIOL 290S.01
      • SEMINAR SPECIAL TOPICS
      • Soc/Psych 331
      • W 01:25 PM-03:55 PM
  • ict background