Lisa A. Keister

Gilhuly Family Professor of Sociology

External Address: 
268 Soc/psych Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Duke Box 90088, Durham, NC 27708-0088
Phone: 
(919) 660-5624

Overview

I do research in the areas of economic sociology, organizations and management, and social networks. I study organization and household behavior in both the U.S. and China, including work on organization strategy and the role that relations among organizations play in shaping strategy, household financial decision making, and business start-up. My work on business networks in China looks at relations among firms and how these shape firm performance, survival, and structure. I also do work on wealth accumulation and the factors that contribute to wealth disparities, including social networks, inheritance, religion, and inheritance.  

 

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., Cornell University 1997

  • M.A., Cornell University 1995

  • M.A., University of Oklahoma 1991

Keister, LA. "Sharing the wealth: the effect of siblings on adults' wealth ownership." Demography 40.3 (August 2003): 521-542. Full Text

Keister, LA. "Repealing the Estate Tax: A Recipe for More Inequality?." Contexts 2 (2003): 42-49. (Academic Article)

Keister, LA. "Financial Markets, Money, and Banking." Annual Review of Sociology 28.1 (August 2002): 39-61. Full Text

Keister, LA. "Banking and Financial Markets in Sociology." Annual Review of Sociology 28 (2002): 39-61. (Academic Article)

Keister, LA. "Corporate Labor Policies and Practices During China’s Transition: An Exploration of Implications for Stratification." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 19 (2002): 169-185. (Academic Article)

Keister, LA, and Aldrich, HE. "Is There a Wealth Affect? Financial and Human Capital as Determinants of Business Startups." Entrepreneurship Research (2002). (Academic Article)

Keister, LA. "Money, Wealth, and Economic Sociology." Accounts: A Newsletter of Economic Sociology 2 (2002). (Academic Article)

Keister, LA. "Corporate labor policies and practices during China's transition: An exploration of implications for social stratification." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 19 (January 2002): 171-187. Full Text

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