Josh Bruce

Overview

I'm a PhD candidate in sociology with concentrations in economic sociology and organization theory. Substantively, my research focuses on the consequences of employment dynamics for both workers and the organizations they interact with. Looking at individuals, I am especially interested in how different patterns of work experience influence employment outcomes, such as salary and managerial promotion. Turning to organizations, I examine how personnel expertise and capabilities affect technological innovation.

To address these research topics, I mostly rely on large datasets, such as US patent records and administrative data on federal government employees. I employ both conventional econometrics and newly developed computational and causal inference methods to study these phenomena.

In addition to my normal graduate student responsibilities, I am also a Project Manager at Duke's Social Science Research Institute, where I take care of administrative issues for the Human Capital and Career Dynamics project.

Bruce, JR. "Getting Ahead by Staying Put? Specialization and Social Capital in U.S. Civil Service Careers." Academy of Management Proceedings 2018.1 (July 2018): 14515-14515. Full Text

Bruce, JR, de Figueiredo, JM, and Silverman, BS. "Public Contracting for Private Innovation: Government Expertise, Decision Rights, and Performance Outcomes." Duke Law School Public Law & Legal Theory Series 2018 (June 1, 2018).

DeFigueiredo, J, Bruce, J, and Silverman, B. "Public Contracting for Private Innovation: Government Expertise, Decision Rights, and Performance Outcomes." National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No. 24724 (2018).